Service Tree

The Service Tree lists all services in "branched" groups, starting with the very general and moving to the very specific. Click on the name of any group name to see the sub-groups available within it. Click on a service code to see its details and the providers who offer that service.

Disease Specific Communicable Disease Control

AIDS/HIV Control

Programs that attempt to control the occurrence of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), a group of symptoms (including certain infections and/or cancers) that collectively characterize the condition and are the result of a weakening of the immune system caused by infection with HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). Activities include surveillance of the occurrence of the disease in the community, investigation of individual cases, and development of case histories and other interventions that will help to increase the medical establishment's understanding of the causes of the diseases and potential methods of prevention and cure. AIDS control activities are often initiated by local HIV prevention planning groups that are responsible for developing needs assessments and planning long and short-term strategies specific to target communities as determined by the studies.

Ebola Control

Programs that attempt to control the occurrence and spread of Ebola, a rare and deadly disease caused by infection with one of the Ebola virus strains found in several African countries. Good outbreak control relies on a defined set of interventions including case management, surveillance and contact tracing, a good laboratory service, safe burials and social mobilization. Community engagement is key to successfully controlling outbreaks. Raising awareness of risk factors for Ebola infection and protective measures that individuals can take is an effective way to reduce human transmission. Health-care workers caring for patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus need to apply extra infection control measures to prevent contact with the patient’s blood and body fluids and contaminated surfaces or materials such as clothing and bedding. Safety measures include wearing face protection (a face shield or a medical mask and goggles), a clean, non-sterile long-sleeved gown, and gloves (sterile gloves for some procedures). Laboratory workers are also at risk. Samples taken from humans and animals for investigation of Ebola infection should be handled by trained staff and processed in suitably equipped laboratories.

Influenza Control

Programs that control the occurrence of influenza by monitoring the incidence of the disease in the general population, identifying the level of influenza activity (no activity, sporadic, local, regional or widespread), determining the types of virus that are circulating, detecting changes in the influenza virus, investigating individual outbreaks, tracking the number of hospitalizations and flu-related deaths, evaluating prevention efforts and taking appropriate measures to prevent disease transmission.

Meningitis Control

Programs that control the occurrence of meningococcal disease/meningitis by monitoring the incidence of the disease in the general population, investigating individual outbreaks and identifying and screening recent contacts of people who are infected to stop the spread of the disease.

Rabies Control

Programs that attempt to control the occurrence of rabies by monitoring the incidence of the disease in bats, coyotes, skunks and other wild animal populations that are susceptible; locating and isolating animals who are suspected of having rabies; and locating and treating people who have been bitten by an animal who may have been rabid.

SARS Control

Programs that attempt to control the occurrence and spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). SARS is an infection that is characterized by a fever of at least 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius) followed by respiratory symptoms such as cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing. Other symptoms may include muscle aches, headaches and a sore throat. In some cases the respiratory symptoms become severe enough that patients require oxygen support and mechanical ventilation. The disease is spread by close personal contact with an infected individual.

Sexually Transmitted Disease Control

Programs that control the occurrence of gonorrhea, syphilis, genital herpes and other diseases that are transmitted by sexual contact by monitoring the incidence of the disease in the general population, investigating individual outbreaks, and identifying and screening recent contacts of people who are infected to stop the spread of the disease.

Tuberculosis Control

Programs that control the occurrence of tuberculosis by monitoring the incidence of the disease in the general population, investigating individual outbreaks and identifying and screening recent contacts of people who are infected to stop the spread of the disease.

Universal Precautions Programs

Programs that develop and implement comprehensive plans which seek to prevent occupational exposure to infectious diseases such as AIDS/HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C, or bacteria, fungi and other bloodborne microorganisms through a combination of engineering and work practice controls, personal protective clothing and equipment, training, medical surveillance, hepatitis B vaccination, signs and labels, and other provisions. Exposure occurs most frequently when nurses, laboratory technicians, physicians, dental personnel, veterinary staff and other health care workers come into contact with an infected patient’s blood (or other potentially infectious bodily fluids) through needlestick injuries or cuts from other sharp instruments that can penetrate the skin including scalpels, scissors, broken glass, broken capillary tubes and exposed ends of dental wires. Exposure may also occur through human bites or contact of the eyes, nose, mouth or skin with a patient's blood. Included are programs that deal generally with occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens and more targeted needlestick injury prevention programs for health care professionals that focus on the proper use, assembly, disassembly and disposal of needles and other "sharps". Also included are community level programs that seek to raise awareness about needle safety; reduce the number of discarded needles on local streets; prevent or reduce the risk of injury to the public, especially children, who find discarded needles in back alleys, playgrounds and dumpsters; and provide options for safe disposal of needles where the need exists.

West Nile Virus Control

Programs that control the occurrence of West Nile Virus by monitoring the incidence of the disease in local bird and mammal populations using mechanisms like dead bird reporting hotlines, and promoting preventive measures to reduce the likelihood of mosquito bites such as the removal of standing water in homes and gardens, encourage people to wear long sleeved clothing and long pants when walking outside in the morning and evening in places where mosquitoes are prevalent, and the application of insect repellent containing DEET.

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